Is grooming an agile ceremony?

What are the ceremonies in agile?

Scrum defines four events (sometimes called ceremonies) that occur inside each sprint: sprint planning, daily scrum, sprint review, and sprint retrospective.

Who grooms the backlog in agile?

Backlog refinement (formerly known as backlog grooming) is when the product owner and some, or all, of the rest of the team review items on the backlog to ensure the backlog contains the appropriate items, that they are prioritized, and that the items at the top of the backlog are ready for delivery.

What is agile meeting?

An agile meeting at the end of the sprint, held by Development Team, Scrum Master and Product Owner, where the stakeholders may be invited as well. The purpose is to demo functionality and discuss with shareholders and others what was accomplished during the sprint.

What is technical grooming?

Grooming is an open discussion between the development team and product owner. The user stories are discussed to help the team gain a better understanding of the functionality that is needed to fulfill a story. This includes design considerations, integrations, and expected user interactions.

What is story grooming in scrum?

Backlog grooming, also referred to as backlog refinement or story time, is a recurring event for agile product development teams. The primary purpose of a backlog grooming session is to ensure the next few sprints worth of user stories in the product backlog are prepared for sprint planning.

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What is an example of an agile ceremony?

The name is quite fancy, but agile ceremonies are four events that occur during a Scrum sprint. These are Sprint Planning, Daily Stand-Up, Sprint Review, and Sprint Retrospective.

What is Sprint planning and grooming?

In order to make the meeting as effective as possible, the top of the backlog — the most important backlog items that should be tackled next — should be well “groomed” or rather “refined” ahead of time. Sprint planning is about learning, considering options and making decisions as a team.